NEWS

This section provides readers with the latest news regarding anti-corruption issues worldwide.

Which Businesses are the Least Transparent?

Nonprofit Transparency International ranks sectors' disclosure records. Its results may surprise. Big Energy is the most "transparent" industry when it comes to corruption-fighting, according to Transparency International, a global anti-corruption watchdog. The might sound surprising. But those who prefer predictability can take heart in the fact that the finance sector is the least transparent, says the group's latest report, issued on Tuesday. That result is weighted by the fact that four of the "least transparent" companies on the overall list are Chinese banks. But the organization says that, nevertheless, "the remaining financial companies were also below average." [field_txt_news_link]

Mongolia's Ex-President Gets Jail over Corruption

Mongolia's former president was sentenced to four years in jail for corruption and the ill-gotten proceeds of his dealings were ordered confiscated, Chinese state media said Friday. Xinhua News Agency said a court in the Mongolian capital, Ulan Bator, convicted Nambar Enkhkbayar on Thursday after a three-day trial and gave him a seven-year sentence with three years pardoned. [field_txt_news_link]

Indian Yoga Guru Detained after Anti-graft Protest

A popular yoga guru and thousands of his supporters were detained by police for several hours Monday after they tried to march to India’s Parliament to intensify an anti-corruption protest and press for a change of government. [field_txt_news_link]

Former FRA Inspector Arrested for Theft

A former Standard Quality Inspector at the Food Reserve Agency (FRA) has been arrested for theft involving K3, 724, 000. Clement Chamatwa Kumalinga has been arrested by the Anti-Corruption Commission and charged with one count of theft contrary to Cap 87 of the laws of Zambia. Kumalinga, 55, of Lusaka’s Jesmondine area is alleged to have, between 6th January, 2010 and 31st December 2010, stolen 76 Kilogrammes of Aluminium Phosphide from the Food Reserve Agency valued at K3, 724, 000 meant for fumigating 5000 metric tonnes of maize in Kafue Depots. [field_txt_news_link]

Anti-corruption Bill for Officials

The Korean ACRC said, it will toughen its crackdown on public officials involved in irregularities as part of efforts to root out corruption in the public sector and to regain people’s trust. Under the bill proposed by the Anti-Corruption and Civil Rights Commission, government officials caught accepting more than 1 million won ($883) in bribes will face punishment of up to three years in prison or fines of up to five times the kickbacks received. [field_txt_news_link]

Citizens Wield Web Tools to Combat Petty Bribery

Citizen Websites and mobile apps are popping up from Colombia to South Africa encouraging people to report the bribes they pay to get a drivers' license, a birth certificate or even to see an emergency doctor. But shining a spotlight on corruption is not proving enough to shame bribe-takers into stopping. Community activists say the next step is to use this new source of data as a lobbying tool to get government officials to act. Two years after the launch of ipaidabribe.com in Bangalore -- a website for citizens to report petty bribery -- the site has become a global model for how crowd-sourcing technology can be used to hold government officials to account. [field_txt_news_link]

Kabul Hospital Hell Reveals Depth of Corruption

In 2010, the US discovered that Afghan soldiers were being starved to death in a US-funded military hospital in Afghanistan, and nothing was done. Now US lawmakers are losing patience with corruption in the country. The scandal first broke in September last year, when the Wall Street Journal ran a feature detailing sickening conditions at the Dawood National Military Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan, a facility being run on US taxpayer's money. [field_txt_news_link]

More Asian Nations Passing Own Anti-corruption Laws

Several Asian countries have passed legislation similar to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the UK Bribery Act to ensure the operations of multinational organisations are adequately regulated, according to a new report by law firm Herbert Smith in Hong Kong. The report found that firms had to deal with an increasing amount of local anti-corruption regulation. "Our report also focuses on the domestic enforcement environment. In recent years we have seen increased attention to the operations of multinational organisations by a number of domestic regulatory and prosecutorial agencies in Asia," he told Thomson Reuters. [field_txt_news_link]

More Asian Nations Passing Own Anti-corruption Laws

Several Asian countries have passed legislation similar to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the UK Bribery Act to ensure the operations of multinational organisations are adequately regulated, according to a new report by law firm Herbert Smith in Hong Kong. The report found that firms had to deal with an increasing amount of local anti-corruption regulation. "Our report also focuses on the domestic enforcement environment. In recent years we have seen increased attention to the operations of multinational organisations by a number of domestic regulatory and prosecutorial agencies in Asia," he told Thomson Reuters. [field_txt_news_link]

Corruption A Leading Theory Behind India's Blackouts

The world's biggest power outages last week have exposed one of India's most serious issues — the growing gap between energy supply and energy demand. Left unheeded, it will deepen gathering doubts about India's dream to become a superpower. A growing economy, ballooning population and burgeoning urbanization are driving energy demands ever upward, while India's investment in power transmission and distribution has not kept up. [field_txt_news_link]

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