NEWS

This section provides readers with the latest news regarding anti-corruption issues worldwide.

Transparency International is Deeply Saddened by the Sudden Passing of Jeremy Pope

Transparency International is deeply saddened by the sudden passing of Jeremy Pope, a founding member and strategic thinker who in many ways symbolized our movement’s enthusiastic commitment to fight corruption. [field_txt_news_link]

Transparency International is Deeply Saddened by the Sudden Passing of Jeremy Pope

 August 29, 2012 Transparency International Transparency International is deeply saddened by the sudden passing of Jeremy Pope, a founding member and strategic thinker who in many ways symbolized our movement’s enthusiastic commitment to fight corruption. [field_txt_news_link]

Operating Responsibly in Emerging Markets: South Korea

Corruption continues to be a key challenge for a business seeking to operate responsibly in South Korea. Ranked by Transparency International in 2011 as the 43rd most corrupt country out of 182, recent reports have questioned the effectiveness of anti-corruption law in South Korea and its enforcement. According to a report from Herbert Smith on anti-corruption in Asia, South Korea's Act on Preventing Bribery of Foreign Officials in International Business Transaction has only led to nine convictions in 13 years. Few Korean companies are revealing data on political 'donations' (comparable to facilitation payments in the West) in their CR reports. [field_txt_news_link]

A Tycoon’s Troubles Highlight Vietnam’s Economic Flaws

Nguyen Duc Kien, a Vietnamese banking tycoon and football fanatic, is, say those who know him, a man who likes to get his own way. Take the inconvenient relegation last year of the football team he owned. He simply bought another top-flight team and merged the two. On the evening of August 20th, however, the 48-year-old’s luck ran out. He was arrested at his fancy Hanoi villa and charged with failing to obtain the proper licences for three small investment firms he chairs. The arrest shocked the country and foreign investors. Mr Kien was one of the Bentley-driving, abalone-munching moguls thought untouchable because of the wealth, power and connections they amassed as the ruling Communist Party followed China’s lead in opening up the economy. [field_txt_news_link]

China Prepares New Plan to Fight Graft That Threatens Its Image

China will impose a new five-year plan to tackle corruption, as the Communist Party seeks to crack down on an issue that risks tarnishing its legitimacy ahead of a leadership transition later this year. “The work of constructing a system of punishing and preventing corruption has shown to be effective,” He Guoqiang, head of the party’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, said yesterday, according to the People’s Daily newspaper. The plan is part of broader efforts to burnish the party’s image before the once-a-decade leadership transition. China’s leaders are seeking to recover from a series of scandals including the downfall of former Chongqing Party Secretary Bo Xilai, and Premier Wen Jiabao warned in March that corruption could endanger the government’s survival. [field_txt_news_link]

Development and Cooperation - EuropeAid

Capacity4dev.eu's August Newsletter [field_txt_news_link]

U.S. Companies Weigh Whether to Invest in Myanmar

U.S. companies have wrapped up their latest trade mission to Myanmar—the second major U.S. business delegation to the once-secretive country in recent months—and participants said they were impressed by the pace of change since a new reformist government took power in the capital of Naypyitaw last year. One of the most obvious changes: A group of a dozen or more local journalists showed up to a news conference held by U.S. officials at the end of the trip, asking blunt questions about how American companies would deal with corruption in Myanmar and whether they would partner with businessmen linked to Myanmar’s former harsh military regime. Such an open discussion wouldn’t have been allowed in Myanmar 18 months earlier, when the country was still transitioning from decades of tight restrictions on speech and freedom of the press. [field_txt_news_link]

Indonesia’s Cops, Graft Fighters Need to Get Along

Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has asked the country’s police and anti-corruption agency to fight graft together, even as the two grapple over which should lead an investigation into alleged corruption within the police force. The Corruption Eradication Commission, known by its local acronym KPK, and the police have recently launched simultaneous investigations into whether some high-ranking police officers stole from state coffers. [field_txt_news_link]

21 Govt Bodies Found to Have Lapses in Managing Public Funds

Ten (10) ministries and 11 statutory boards in Singapore have been found to have lapses in managing public funds and resources. This is according to a report by the Auditor-General's Office, which investigated complaints on such matters for the financial year 2011 to 2012. The report said improvements can be made in several areas, including internal controls, payment administration, contract management for work or services, and approving officers' scrutiny. The Auditor-General also emphasised the need for meticulous documentation in procurements. [field_txt_news_link]

India’s Unlikely Anti-graft Tsar Speaks His Mind

Vinod Rai is not famous. His title evokes merely tedium—the Comptroller and Auditor General of India (CAG). Mr Rai gamely details the many good works of his organisation, which employs 45,000 folk, most of them checking the book-keeping and compliance processes of the public sector. But in truth that is no longer the main event. Instead, the CAG has become a source of hope at a time of growing despair over India’s troubled governance. [field_txt_news_link]

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